Tag Archives: buying a home

What You Should Know About Browsing Listings Online

As you browse listings on BHHSHodnettCooper.com or  realtor.com, you may find homes you like that appear to be unavailable, due to some kind of contingency. If you find the perfect home, but it’s labeled Active Kick Out or Contingent, should you pursue it or forget it? What You Should Know About Browsing Listings Online:

The reality is that contracts fall through sometimes. If you have a back-up contract, you can buy the home should it come “Back on Market” or “BOM.”

Active kick out
Active kick out means the seller has accepted a contingent offer, such as the buyer has a home to sell before they can close on the seller’s home. The seller can reserve the right to accept a better offer and “kick out” the previous buyer. They must give the first buyer 48 to 72 hours to either remove the contingency and move forward with the purchase, or back out of the contract.

Contingency
Nearly all offers-to-buy have contingencies. Typical contingencies include provisions that the home must meet the appraised value by the mortgage lender’s third-party appraiser, or it must pass a professional third-party home inspection to the buyer’s satisfaction. The buyer may make the contract contingent upon the lender funding the purchase.

Option period
Option periods give the buyer time to get financing and complete home inspections and the appraisal. Unless the buyer acts on a contingency, the home is considered out of option but it can still fall out of escrow.

To learn more, contact your Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices network professional.

Should You Buy a Home With A Swimming Pool?

It’s the heat of the summer, and you want a home with a swimming pool but before you go off the deep end, make sure the benefits outweigh the drawbacks.

Swimming pools are a strong part of the outdoor living trend. They’re fun for all ages, they promote fitness, and they give you a great place to entertain family and friends. They also add costs, increased liability and ongoing maintenance. So, to help you decide if it’s worth it, ask yourself the following questions:

Do you and your family members swim now? Would you swim more in a pool of your own?

Are pools popular in your area? Do you have a long, hot swimming season?

Does the pool complement the home? Or did the pool replace an amenity you might need such as a play-yard?

How old is the pool? Do any mechanical components need to be replaced? Are there any visible cracks, broken tiles, or cloudy water that could mean large expenses coming?

Where will people change their clothes and use the restroom? Will they leave tracks through the house?

Ask the seller for any maintenance and repair records they might have for the pool, and include the pool in the home inspection. Obtain recent prices from local pool companies on similar pools and see if you are overpaying for the seller’s pool, especially if it needs updating. Most pool companies are happy to oblige in order to get the maintenance, repair, or redesign business from the new owner.

Five Safe Strategies for Homebuying

With home prices and interest rates rising, you may be wondering if now is the best time to buy a home. The answer is always yes but there are ways to buy wisely and safely. Here are Five Safe Strategies for Homebuying.

Save for a down payment. The more money you can put down, the better borrowing terms you’ll get on your mortgage. Establish a firm budget. Limit credit card spending and pay down your debts. Put your next raise into savings.Five Safe Strategies for Homebuying

Choose wisely. Your home should improve your lifestyle, but not cripple you with debt. It should serve your household’s needs for at least five to ten years, so consider location, neighborhood, commute times, size, number of bedrooms, amenities and condition.

Buy within your means. Your payment, including interest and taxes, should be no more than 28-30 percent of your gross income or 40-42 percent of your income including existing debt. As your income improves, you’ll be able to meet other life goals, such as growing your family, starting a business, or buying more property.

Buy for the long term. The longer you own your home, the more equity, or ownership, you have and the less you owe the bank. Think of equity like savings you’ll get back when you sell or rent the property some day.

Take care of your property. Keeping your home repaired and updated is the best thing you can do to protect your investment. A home in top condition always sells for more money than homes in less desirable condition.

It always a good idea to consult your financial advisor.